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A brief Corley Avenue update

First, signs of activity at the Corley Half House now extend to the arrival of a porta-potty. The concrete that was poured through the basement window to stabilize the now-removed portion has been dug out and carted off.

It will be interesting to see if the missing half is restored to match the remaining half. More likely, I think, is a different design and, pehaps, an additional storey. Time will tell.

The other house I have been following from the beginning is the pied á terre that Rob is building for himself, with the help of his son Josh.

The windows are in, in time to make for comfortable finishing inside during the winter months.

Corley innovation: Small home, small car

A couple of weeks ago, Danica and I were happy to see work resuming on Corley Avenue’s innovative pied-à-terre. The stacks of new timber are going into place, in a way that surprised us.

Skilfully engineered into the small frontage, 6×6 timbers form stepped planter boxes. Look at the hill beside, on the right. That’s basically all the space that’s been used. Now it’s going to give the little house some presence on the street.

Today I was fortunate to be passing at lunchtime. Rob and Josh were out front and filled in some blanks. What’s happening in the centre opening? A small car will be going in there. Perfect companion for the concept.

Usually the landscaping gets done last, but in this case the timber planter boxes will not impede construction and they will provide a stable base for scaffolding, when it comes time to do the windows and stucco.

This search link will pull up previous posts about this nifty project. Of course, more will follow.

Blue tarps on Corley

It looks smaller, all buttoned up in plywood and blue-tarped on top. Yes, plywood, not chipboard. Quality all the way. (Previous view)

The little pied à terre will regain its appearance of size when the window and door openings appear. Meanwhile, it’s keeping the snow out and work can continue inside.

Blue tarps also cover the wall at the unfortunate building up the street on Corley. No one is going to be home for Christmas on either side, even though one half of the semi-detached house appears secure.

The foundation failed last January, during a renovation attempt, so it has taken nearly a year to get this far. I notice that the porch pillars are gone now from the missing house. I thought they might have been salvageable, but no. (Previous view)